jks

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jks
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  • Using BB Black wireless or BB Green wireless board

    Yes, a WiFi dongle on the end of a USB cable with some type 77 and/or 43 toroid cores as a common mode choke is a great idea. Be sure to use a 5V power supply of at least 2A. The Beagle manual warns about the increased current requirements when using WiFi dongles.

    A long Ethernet cable shouldn't be a problem (the spec is 100m max). Just use toroids as above at the Beagle end. Because Ethernet uses differential signaling it isn't much of a problem except for the EMI from elsewhere that rides down the cable common mode. Be sure not to use shielded Ethernet cable as this may cause a big ground loop depending on your equipment grounding.

    ajwhall
  • Using BB Black wireless or BB Green wireless board

    Hi Andrew,

    I need to add a FAQ about Kiwi WiFi connections. Let me tell you what I know.

    It has been successfully done with a USB dongle by Yuri at http://msk.swl.su:8073 (see his top bar photo). He runs a loop and the noise floor is clean. So there is no problem with HF interference from the dongle. There are software issues though. The Kiwi works, but doesn't display the local ip address properly, etc. I need to fix this.

    The BBG wireless (BBGW) is not physically compatible with Beagle capes due to how Seeed placed the USB-A connectors, i.e. you can't plug in a Kiwi board without it hitting the USB connectors. Now you could use some Beagle header extenders to build-up the header stack to get clearance. But I have not tried this yet. The electrical implications are unknown. And such a stack would obviously not fit in the plastic case. To see this problem look at an end-on photo of the BBGW at the Seeed site: https://www.seeedstudio.com/SeeedStudio-BeagleBone-Green-Wireless-p-2650.html

    The BeagleBone Black wireless (BBBW), which was recently introduced, is cape physically compatible. But I have not tried this one either.

    A while ago I ran an experiment where I brought a running BBGW close to a running Kiwi and noticed the HF noise floor rise. So that worried me. Note that the WiFI chip and output coaxes and antennas of the BBGW is at the end of the Beagle PCB nearest the Kiwi HF/GPS front-ends. Whereas the BBBW and use of a WiFi dongle on a BBB are at the other (safer) end where the power connection is.

    ajwhall
  • release v1.72/73: WSPR decoder improvements, control panel hide button

    Strong signals often cause weaker "images" at different frequencies in the WSPR display. The underlying cause is still not understood. But now spots with the same callsign will only have the strongest one uploaded to prevent polluting the wsprnet.org database. You'll still see multiple spots in the WSPR viewer because they are displayed incrementally as they are decoded. But at the end only the strongest non-duplicates will be uploaded.

    A multi-pass scheme has been implemented to help decode weaker signals. After the first pass any remaining signals will be rerun through the decoder with increased effort parameters (that take more decoding time) until the full two minute decoding interval is exhausted. Previously decoding was stopped after only one pass.

    The main KiwiSDR control panel at the bottom right of the window finally has a "hide" button at the top right like the other panels. This should be helpful for iPad and other mobile device users.

    KA7USergeWA2ZKD
  • release v1.72/73: WSPR decoder improvements, control panel hide button

    Strong signals often cause weaker "images" at different frequencies in the WSPR display. The underlying cause is still not understood. But now spots with the same callsign will only have the strongest one uploaded to prevent polluting the wsprnet.org database. You'll still see multiple spots in the WSPR viewer because they are displayed incrementally as they are decoded. But at the end only the strongest non-duplicates will be uploaded.

    A multi-pass scheme has been implemented to help decode weaker signals. After the first pass any remaining signals will be rerun through the decoder with increased effort parameters (that take more decoding time) until the full two minute decoding interval is exhausted. Previously decoding was stopped after only one pass.

    The main KiwiSDR control panel at the bottom right of the window finally has a "hide" button at the top right like the other panels. This should be helpful for iPad and other mobile device users.

    KA7USergeWA2ZKD
  • release v1.72/73: WSPR decoder improvements, control panel hide button

    Strong signals often cause weaker "images" at different frequencies in the WSPR display. The underlying cause is still not understood. But now spots with the same callsign will only have the strongest one uploaded to prevent polluting the wsprnet.org database. You'll still see multiple spots in the WSPR viewer because they are displayed incrementally as they are decoded. But at the end only the strongest non-duplicates will be uploaded.

    A multi-pass scheme has been implemented to help decode weaker signals. After the first pass any remaining signals will be rerun through the decoder with increased effort parameters (that take more decoding time) until the full two minute decoding interval is exhausted. Previously decoding was stopped after only one pass.

    The main KiwiSDR control panel at the bottom right of the window finally has a "hide" button at the top right like the other panels. This should be helpful for iPad and other mobile device users.

    KA7USergeWA2ZKD
  • How do you use your SDR

    I'd also like to know how many people are reluctant to make their Kiwi public due to bandwidth consumption concerns. Either because their Internet service has a low monthly cap (several to tens of GB) or because the Kiwi doesn't yet have tools for displaying and throttling bandwidth use.

    WA2ZKD
  • Help us test new feature: "auto add router NAT rule"

    WA2ZKD/KA7U: Interesting your routers require you to enable UPnP. Security feature I guess. Kinda defeats the purpose of lessening the setup burden.

    ic8pof: If you are seeing the message "NAT port mapping in local network firewall/router created" in the log then the next time you go to the network tab after restarting the server you should get the green message that says:
    Automatic add of NAT rule on firewall / router: succeeded
    You won't see the message immediately after changing the button from "no" to "yes". You have to restart the server first.

    UR5VIB: excellent point about router reboots. I had not considered that.

    G8JNJ: I'm not sure what you mean by "separate firewall rule didn't seem to load". The Kiwi only sends a single NAT rule (port forwarding) via UPnP. No other firewall related rules if those are required by your router. You would still have to configure those manually.


    UR5VIBSerge
  • ipad iOS bandwidth adjustment [v1.67 touch events added]

    In the v1.67 release I added some touch event support. So now if you zoom in sufficiently you should be able to touch-drag on the passband edges to change the bandwidth. You can also drag across the frequency scale to move the passband smoothly. tapping anywhere will set the frequency. Dragging outside the frequency scale (waterfall, spectrum, etc.) will shift the waterfall.

    It doesn't work perfectly but it's a big improvement. Tested on iPad, iPhone, Android.

    WA2ZKDG8JNJ
  • ipad iOS bandwidth adjustment [v1.67 touch events added]

    In the v1.67 release I added some touch event support. So now if you zoom in sufficiently you should be able to touch-drag on the passband edges to change the bandwidth. You can also drag across the frequency scale to move the passband smoothly. tapping anywhere will set the frequency. Dragging outside the frequency scale (waterfall, spectrum, etc.) will shift the waterfall.

    It doesn't work perfectly but it's a big improvement. Tested on iPad, iPhone, Android.

    WA2ZKDG8JNJ
  • Help us test new feature: "auto add router NAT rule"

    WA2ZKD/KA7U: Interesting your routers require you to enable UPnP. Security feature I guess. Kinda defeats the purpose of lessening the setup burden.

    ic8pof: If you are seeing the message "NAT port mapping in local network firewall/router created" in the log then the next time you go to the network tab after restarting the server you should get the green message that says:
    Automatic add of NAT rule on firewall / router: succeeded
    You won't see the message immediately after changing the button from "no" to "yes". You have to restart the server first.

    UR5VIB: excellent point about router reboots. I had not considered that.

    G8JNJ: I'm not sure what you mean by "separate firewall rule didn't seem to load". The Kiwi only sends a single NAT rule (port forwarding) via UPnP. No other firewall related rules if those are required by your router. You would still have to configure those manually.


    UR5VIBSerge