rrobinet

I have configured several Kiwis for wifi access by attaching an inexpensive router configured as a Wifi client to the ethernet port of the Kiwi. This $25 TP Link has worked well for me: https://smile.amazon.com/TP-Link-Wireless-Portable-Travel-Router/dp/B00TQEX8BO/ref=sr_1_14?keywords=tplink+wifi+router&qid=1548188019&sr=8-14 In principle one could enable the internal BB Wifi or attach a USB wifi adapter, but I am reluctant to fiddle with the Kiwi's OS.

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rrobinet
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  • OpenWebRX [using a transverter/down-converter with the Kiwi]

    I bought but have not yet deployed two of the $150 High Sierra Microwave downconverters Jim described http://www.hsmicrowave.com/sdr.html, one for 6M and another for 70cm. They will customize the input frequency and include all the filtering, but you will need to supply a LO. For WSPR a high stability GPSDO LO like the $150 Leo Bodnar would be needed, but for other modes that would be over specced.
    Lonecrow
  • Kiwi Does Indeed Do The Job On WSPR

    The next version of kiwiwspr logs its name along with the spots, so we can download the database zip files and see who is running kiwiwspr
    KK6PR
  • 8 channel Kiwi WSPR decoding script 'kiwiwspr.sh' using Raspberry Pi or other external server

    I have attached version kiwiwspr.sh 1.1g which includes a number of significant enhancements. The most important in my judgement is that it now tests the version of wsprd and if wsprd 2.0 is installed it is run with command line flags which will result in 10% more spots from the same captures.
    You can obtain that new wsprd by downloading to your Pi the WSJT-x 2.0 release candidate from the WSJT-x web site. I am told we can expect no further ?hanges in the wsprd included in the current RC3 package.
    To install this version, download this file to your Pi and rename it to kiwiwsr.sh and then replace your current kiwiwspr.sh with the renamed version.
    Verify the version you are running with "./kiwiwspr.sh -V'
    KK6PR
  • 8 channel Kiwi WSPR decoding script 'kiwiwspr.sh' using Raspberry Pi or other external server

    Version 1.1e has been in reliable service at a number of sites for a week. To summarize a clean installation:

    1) create the directory /home/pi/ham/kiwiwspr

    2) copy kiwiwspr-1-1e.sh to /home/pi/ham/kiwiwspr/kiwiwspr.sh

    3) run "chmod +x /home/pi/ham/kiwiwspr/kiwiwspr.sh"

    4) run: "/home/pi/ham/kiwiwspr/kiwiwspr.sh -h" until you are no longer prompted to install any of the following programs:
    The program will prompt you to install kiwirecorder.py. Download it from https://github.com/jks-prv/kiwiclient/tree/jks-v0.1 to /home/pi/ham/kiwiwspr/kiwiclient-jks-v0.1
    The program will prompt you in install WSJT-x from http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wsjtx.html
    The program will prompt you to install 'bc' by running: 'sudo apt-get install bc'

    5) Edit the prototype configuration file '/home/pi/ham/kiwiwspr/kiwiwspr.conf' created during step #4 to reflect:
    a) The name for your Kiwi(s), their IP addresses and Grid locator
    b) The schedule of WSPR bands for it to spot. Configure only hour '00:00' if you want the same configuration 24/7

    6) run "./kiwiwspr.sh -j a" to start the capture jobs defined in your kiwiwspr.conf

    7) print the status of your jobs by running "./kiwiwspr.sh -j s"

    Once "./kiwiwspr.sh -j s" lists capture and decode daemons for each of your configured bands:

    8) run "./kiwiwspr.sh -w a" to start the watchdog daemon which will every 2 minutes verify that your jobs are still running and execute the configuration changes defined in your kiwiwspr.conf
    "./kiwiwspr.sh -w a" will also configure your Pi so the watchdog daemon runs every time your Pi is powered up or rebooted.

    Finally, each job writes 200 Kbps of wav data to files in /tmp/kiwi-captures/... If that file tree is at its Pi default location on the microSD, this writing will significantly shorten the lifetime of the microSD. To avoid that wear, configure your Pi's /etc/fstab to make /tmp/kiwi-captures/ a ramdisk file system:

    pi@PiKPH:~/ham/kiwiwspr $ tail -2 /etc/fstab
    ### For kwiwwspr.sh capture files
    tmpfs /tmp/kiwi-captures tmpfs defaults,noatime,nosuid,size=100m 0 0
    pi@PiKPH:~/ham/kiwiwspr
    n6gnPowernumpty
  • 8 channel Kiwi WSPR decoding script 'kiwiwspr.sh' using Raspberry Pi or other external server

    Version 1.1e has been in reliable service at a number of sites for a week. To summarize a clean installation:

    1) create the directory /home/pi/ham/kiwiwspr

    2) copy kiwiwspr-1-1e.sh to /home/pi/ham/kiwiwspr/kiwiwspr.sh

    3) run "chmod +x /home/pi/ham/kiwiwspr/kiwiwspr.sh"

    4) run: "/home/pi/ham/kiwiwspr/kiwiwspr.sh -h" until you are no longer prompted to install any of the following programs:
    The program will prompt you to install kiwirecorder.py. Download it from https://github.com/jks-prv/kiwiclient/tree/jks-v0.1 to /home/pi/ham/kiwiwspr/kiwiclient-jks-v0.1
    The program will prompt you in install WSJT-x from http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wsjtx.html
    The program will prompt you to install 'bc' by running: 'sudo apt-get install bc'

    5) Edit the prototype configuration file '/home/pi/ham/kiwiwspr/kiwiwspr.conf' created during step #4 to reflect:
    a) The name for your Kiwi(s), their IP addresses and Grid locator
    b) The schedule of WSPR bands for it to spot. Configure only hour '00:00' if you want the same configuration 24/7

    6) run "./kiwiwspr.sh -j a" to start the capture jobs defined in your kiwiwspr.conf

    7) print the status of your jobs by running "./kiwiwspr.sh -j s"

    Once "./kiwiwspr.sh -j s" lists capture and decode daemons for each of your configured bands:

    8) run "./kiwiwspr.sh -w a" to start the watchdog daemon which will every 2 minutes verify that your jobs are still running and execute the configuration changes defined in your kiwiwspr.conf
    "./kiwiwspr.sh -w a" will also configure your Pi so the watchdog daemon runs every time your Pi is powered up or rebooted.

    Finally, each job writes 200 Kbps of wav data to files in /tmp/kiwi-captures/... If that file tree is at its Pi default location on the microSD, this writing will significantly shorten the lifetime of the microSD. To avoid that wear, configure your Pi's /etc/fstab to make /tmp/kiwi-captures/ a ramdisk file system:

    pi@PiKPH:~/ham/kiwiwspr $ tail -2 /etc/fstab
    ### For kwiwwspr.sh capture files
    tmpfs /tmp/kiwi-captures tmpfs defaults,noatime,nosuid,size=100m 0 0
    pi@PiKPH:~/ham/kiwiwspr
    n6gnPowernumpty